CoA9.mp4
COA9P2.mp4
COA9P3CONNECT.mp4

Direct Instruction

In my last episode I showed the first half of a DMIC maths (Developing Mathematical Inquiry Communities) lesson. In this episode I show the second half (with a different group and question).

DMIC has a very structured lesson format which teachers should follow. You can read an in-depth description of these here. I have put several videos of different parts of the DMIC lesson.

Video 1 and 2 - students sharing their work and audience members trying to understand what they did.

Video 3 - myself 'connect'ing the lesson together and offering extension for more advanced students.


Extended lesson plan.

Reflection on the video clip

  • The first group (not filmed) only presented the first part of the solution - showing 1/4 of Lucy's chocolate was left because that was all they could access. I got them to present that part so they were involved. They didn't have the knowledge to access the decimal part of the problem and that is okay.
  • Group 2 - This group didn't really work together as a group to answer their question. Davlyn explained, drew and then answered questions while the other two didn't contribute as much. I should have asked Davlyn to stop part way through his explanation and asked one of the other boys to take over talking, so they would have a chance to talk as well.
  • Group 3 - Again this group was dominated by one person. Kordell and Ana helped to explain where they could. Maria didn't say anything. In context, they were the only 2 girls in the class at the time with 12 boys so were very shy and quiet the whole time. When these two present with other girls in the audience they are much more confident. It is important to consider these things when grouping students. This particular day, all the other girls in the class were at Kapa Haka so this couldn't be avoided.
  • I should have stopped the second group after Davlyn drew the box and cut it into quarters, had them say "Ask us a question" - check understanding, then draw the next part. When students present the whole explanation at once, the audience can be overwhelmed and not know which parts they don't understand, and may not know what to ask. It is better to get students to explain bit by bit so the audience has time to process.
  • Connect - I can tell that less students initially participate in the 'connect' discussion - mostly Timote and Davlyn sharing their ideas. This is because others may not have been able to access that knowledge, as the 'connect' is the extension of the learning. After a while, the others start to join in as they understand what we are talking about.
  • I thought there was good demonstration of the structure of DMIC and Talk moves used
    • Keru - "ask us a question"
    • Timote - "can you repeat that?"
    • Myself - "I'm just going to re-voice what you are saying...", "do you agree?", "Are you saying that...", "Davlyn added on by saying...", "Can anyone add on?"
  • I love the maths concepts that come up throughout the discussion
    • Paula - "the more pieces there are, the smaller the pieces you got"
    • Davlyn - "the bigger the denominator is, the smaller the pieces are"
    • Tipene - "four quarters are one whole"
    • Terell - "one whole and one quarter is 5 quarters" (improper fractions).
    • Timote "5+5=10", added onto by Davlyn and Ana "0.5+0.5=1"
    • Properties of fractions - (I.e. is this one and that one still quarters even though they are drawn differently?)
    • Properties of decimals - how 0.5, 0.50, 0.500 and 0.5000 can be considered as equivalent.
    • Davlyn talked about how when we halved 0.25 we "added thousandths", meaning that we put thousandths into 0.125 when there wasn't any in 0.25 - great place value knowledge.

Class Site Content

Term 3, Week 2

Make a screencast and explain how these two numbers (on Google Drawing) are the same or different, or which is bigger or smaller.


After your problem solving session, complete this matching activity by drawing lines to connect the decimal, percentage and fraction that are equivalent (the same).

Learner Generated Content